The Danger of a Single Story

By Chimamanda Adichie (Nigeria)

‘Stories matter. Many stories matter. Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign, but stories can also be used to empower and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a people, but stories can also repair that broken dignity… I would like to end with this thought: That when we reject the single story, when we realize that there is never a single story about any place, we regain a kind of paradise’.

Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice — and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding.

Have you been guilty of this?

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The #Me Too# Campaign on Sexual Harrassment

In support of the #me too# campaign:

  1. Lupita Nyong’o: Speaking Out About Harvey Weinstein by Lupita Nyongo

‘I hope we can form a community where a woman can speak up about abuse and not suffer another abuse by not being believed and instead being ridiculed. That’s why we don’t speak up — for fear of suffering twice, and for fear of being labeled and characterized by our moment of powerlessness’. Lupita Nyogo

Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/19/opinion/lupita-nyongo-harvey-weinstein.html

2.       Our story of rape and reconciliation by Thordis Elva (TED Talk)

I was raised in a world where girls are taught that they get raped for a reason. Their skirt was too short, their smile was too wide, their breath smelled of alcohol. And I was guilty of all of those things, so the shame had to be mine. It took me years to realize that only one thing could have stopped me from being raped that night, and it wasn’t my skirt, it wasn’t my smile, it wasn’t my childish trust. The only thing that could’ve stopped me from being raped that night is the man who raped me — had he stopped himself’. Thordis Elva

Source:https://www.ted.com/talks/thordis_elva_tom_stranger_our_story_of_rape_and_reconciliation/discussion?utm_campaign=social&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_content=talk&utm_term=global-social%20issues#t-199673

3.     Violence against women — it’s a men’s issue by Jackson Katz (TED Talk)

‘But there’s so many men who care deeply about these issues, but caring deeply is not enough. We need more men with the guts, with the courage, with the strength, with the moral integrity to break our complicit silence and challenge each other and stand with women and not against them’. Jackson Katz

Source:https://www.ted.com/talks/jackson_katz_violence_against_women_it_s_a_men_s_issue

4.     Street Harassment by BBC

Harassment in public spaces is something that most women have experienced or will experience’

Source:https://www.facebook.com/BBC100women/videos/vb.948946275170651/1545931298805476/?type=2&theater

 

 

Dancing at the Party…

Two great articles here, the first on Inclusion by Elizabeth Shaw, including the great quote “diversity is being invited to the party, but inclusion is being asked to dance”…. although we could take it further and say “it’s also about leading the dance”… click here for the piece.

The second is called The Problem with photo-journalism and Africa: Why African photographers don’t get to tell African photo stories in the Western media.  Please check this revealing piece here

Finally, here’s a nice quote on inclusion from Manish Jain

“In the conventional sense, diversity is often achieved by simply bringing people of different backgrounds and cultures together. Yes, this is diversity, but without inclusion, diversity lacks deeper purpose and meaning. To ensure that individuals are truly included, it is important to understand the backgrounds, cultures, and worldviews of all individuals in an organization.”