On Feminism, Fiction and the Illusion of Democracy – Dr. Nawal El Saadawi (Egypt)

Greetings.  In this post , we share several interviews with Dr. Nawal El Saadawi from Egypt.

Dr. Saadawi is a formidable medical doctor, author, campaigner and activist  and a leading Egyptian, Arab and Global feminist voice. She was born in 1931, in the village of Kafr Tahla, just north of Cairo, the second of nine children. She graduated from the University of Cairo in 1955, specialising in psychiatry, and returned to Kafr Tahla to work as a doctor, over the years becoming increasingly prominent.  She has written more than 50 books in Arabic and many of these have been translated to over 30 different languages.

Click here to read a powerful interview with her in the Guardian newspaper entitled: “Do you feel you are Liberated? I feel I am not.”

Dr. Saadawi is the subject of the film She Spoke the Unspeakable, directed by Jill Nicholls, broadcast in February 2017 in the BBC One television series Imagine.

 

 

 

Below is another interview she had with BBC Hard talk:

 

 

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Gender – Based Analysis Plus online course

Hello all,

It has been quite a while! This has been because of competing demands based on work exigencies and family commitment. We hope you are thriving!

We welcome you to undertake this Gender- Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) e course that has been developed by Status of Women Canada and which has been adopted by the Government of Canada.

GBA+ is an analytical tool used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people may experience policies, programs and initiatives. The “plus” in GBA+ acknowledges that GBA goes beyond biological (sex) and socio-cultural (gender) differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ also considers many other identity factors, like race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.

You can access the course on the below link:

http://www.swc-cfc.gc.ca/gba-acs/course-cours-2017/eng/mod00/mod00_01_01.html

Trailblazers

It is difficult for me as a journalist to see important stories go untold. But perhaps more important, as a woman of color, I am pained when the powerful stories of incredible women and minorities are not brought to light’. Amisha Padnani

The International Womens day 2018 saw a number of phenomenal women being featured in news articles. It is a privilege to come behind the trailblazers who fought battles as pioneers that many of us will not have to. We celebrate all trailblazers, whether listed here or not. We begin from a local (Kenyan) perspective to the global arena.

We would love to know – who is your phenomenal inclusion trailblazer?

Please share with us through:  socialinclusion4all@gmail.com

  1. Our very own Kenyan trailblazers

You can click here to read on these phenomenal women

2. The Women of Africa BBC series

‘If your dreams do not scare you, they are probably not big enough’ HE Ellen Sirleaf Johnson

To access these videos , click here 

3. Overlooked‘ Series on the NYTimes

Obituary writing is more about life than death: the last word, a testament to a human contribution. Yet who gets remembered — and how — inherently involves judgment. To look back at the obituary archives can, therefore, be a stark lesson in how society valued various achievements and achievers…Now we are adding stories of remarkable women’.  Amisha Padnani and Jessica Bennett. March 8 2018.

 

Quote for the week – Margaret Ogola

“Unless we recognise that each individual is irrepeatable and valuable by virtue of simply being conceived human, we cannot begin to talk about human rights. This includes the right to be born, as all of us have enjoyed. True justice should be for each human being, visible and invisible, young and old, disabled and able, to enjoy fully their right to life. The accidental attributes that we acquire such as colour, sex intelligence, economic circumstances, physical or mental disability should not be used as an excuse to deprive a person of life.”

Taken from a speech made in Beijing in 1995 called “On the Dignity of the African Woman”, which can be viewed here.  Margaret Ogola has inspired many readers in Kenya and beyond with her novels, which often give a particular focus to the status of women in society.  She died of cancer in 2011, you can read more about her in this newspaper article here and a warm, powerful tribute here which also discusses issues of Gender and Sexuality in depth.

Social Inclusion Hero: Celebrating Dr Denis Mukwege (DR Congo)

For this piece, we thought it appropriate to honour the work of Dr Denis Mukwege in Bukavu, DR Congo, who has gone from being a pioneering surgeon to an international human rights advocate in the fight against Rape and Sexual Violence. There is growing awareness worldwide that rape is used as a weapon of war in conflict. We wish to bring attention to the enormous challenge facing women and children and especially those in conflict situations.

Image result for dr denis mukwege

Dr. Denis Mukwege, 62,  is a world-renowned gynaecological surgeon who is the founder and medical director of Panzi Hospital in Bukavu, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). He founded the hospital in 1999 as a clinic for gynaecological and obstetric care, and expected to be working on issues of maternal health. Since 1999, however, Dr. Mukwege and his staff have helped to care for more than 50,000 survivors of sexual violence. The hospital not only treats survivors with physical wounds, but also provides legal, and psycho-social services to its patients. Even patients who cannot afford post-rape medical care are treated without charge at Panzi Hospital.

“When war turns on women and children, I think the world must do more for them,” he says.

For an overview about Dr Denis, please see here and a recent article giving a summary of his work is here.

The work of Panzi Foundation can be read about here and specifically the Panzi holistic healing model is described here.

There is also a more in-depth article from 2009 that is still very relevant today and is co-authored by Dr Denis with Cathy Nangini titled “Rape with Extreme Violence: The New Pathology in South Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo” that can be read here.

Dr. Denis Mukwege is our first Social Inclusion Hero(ine) for February 2017 and we plan to honour many more on a monthly basis.  If you would like to propose someone, please do get in touch…

E-mail us at social.inclusion4all@gmail.com

16 Days of Activism against Gender Based Violence

Greetings everyone.  This year’s 16 Days of Activism started on November 25th and will run until December 10th.  The theme this year is “Together we can end GBV in Education”.  For more about the campaign and to download the action toolkit, please click here

For information on UN Women activities, please click here

For background information about the 16 Days Campaign, please click here

As we celebrate 16 days of activism against GBV, did you know that Women and Girls with disabilities experience double discrimination, which places them at higher risk of gender-based violence, sexual abuse, neglect, maltreatment and exploitation. The global literacy rate in some places can be as low as one per cent for women with disabilities, according to a UNDP study. The World Bank reports that every minute more than 30 women are seriously injured or disabled during labour and that those 15-50 million women generally go unnoticed…

Please use the following hashtags to get involved with the campaign:

#SayNoToGBV

#IStandwithGirlsWithDisabilities

#16DaysOfActivismAgainstGBV2017

#YouHaveThePower2ChangeYourLife