International Albinism Awareness Day

For this post, we are celebrating International Albinism Awareness Day, 13th June.

People with albinism face multiple forms of discrimination worldwide. Albinism is still profoundly misunderstood, socially and medically. The physical appearance of persons with albinism is often the object of erroneous attitudes, beliefs and myths influenced by superstition, which foster their marginalisation and social exclusion. This leads to various forms and practices of stigma and discrimination, and endanger the security and lives of persons with albinism who are at constant risk. These beliefs and myths are centuries old and are present in cultural attitudes and practices around the world.

On 18 December 2014, the General Assembly adopted a resolution proclaiming, with effect from 2015, 13th June as International Albinism Awareness Day.

Please find below a few resources that shed more light on why this day is important for all of us.

  • GIZA (Darkness) is a beautiful short film made by Isack Abel from Tanzania who has albinism and in which he expresses his feelings about the Fight Against Albino Killings. Please watch this and share widely for awareness and action.
  • A BBC documentary on ‘living differently‘ that features Leo, a young man whose brother and sister also have albinism. Although he struggled to accept the condition as a child, Leo grew to be proud of his unique looks and has become a model. Leo’s high profile modelling career is a source of inspiration to other young people with albinism.
  • Salif Keita Global Foundation – Salif Keita is a world renowned musician from Mali. He is the first African to receive a Grammy nomination for his album “AMEN” and has been cited as “one of the greatest talents Africa has ever produced”.  Mr. Keita has raised awareness about the plight of albinos in Africa around the world to millions of people with the help of campaigns, albums, interviews, books, social media, and mainstream media. His foundation is the leading organisation in raising global awareness for the cause of albinism in Africa.
  • Under The Same Sun (UTTS) is an organisation that works support people with albinism become fully contributing members of an inclusive and equitable society.
  • UN resources on albinism. More resources about the UN Day are available here.

The “call to action” here is for all of us to learn, unlearn and challenge ourselves, our attitudes and behaviour. More on how you can be involved here

Happy International Albinism Awareness Day

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I am not Your Inspiration, Thank you Very Much!

by Stella Young (TED Talk)

”I’ve lost count of the number of times that I’ve been approached by strangers wanting to tell me that they think I’m brave or inspirational, and this was long before my work had any kind of public profile. They were just kind of congratulating me for managing to get up in the morning and remember my own name.  And it is objectifying. These images, those images objectify disabled people for the benefit of non disabled people. They are there so that you can look at them and think that things aren’t so bad for you, to put your worries into perspective”. Stella Young (April 2014).

You can watch the video here or by clicking on the picture below:

Stella Young is a comedian and journalist who happens to go about her day in a wheelchair — a fact that doesn’t, she’d like to make clear, automatically turn her into a noble inspiration to all humanity. In this very funny talk, Young breaks down society’s habit of turning disabled people into “inspiration porn.”

 This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxSydney (Australia), an independent event.

16 Days of Activism against Gender Based Violence

Greetings everyone.  This year’s 16 Days of Activism started on November 25th and will run until December 10th.  The theme this year is “Together we can end GBV in Education”.  For more about the campaign and to download the action toolkit, please click here

For information on UN Women activities, please click here

For background information about the 16 Days Campaign, please click here

As we celebrate 16 days of activism against GBV, did you know that Women and Girls with disabilities experience double discrimination, which places them at higher risk of gender-based violence, sexual abuse, neglect, maltreatment and exploitation. The global literacy rate in some places can be as low as one per cent for women with disabilities, according to a UNDP study. The World Bank reports that every minute more than 30 women are seriously injured or disabled during labour and that those 15-50 million women generally go unnoticed…

Please use the following hashtags to get involved with the campaign:

#SayNoToGBV

#IStandwithGirlsWithDisabilities

#16DaysOfActivismAgainstGBV2017

#YouHaveThePower2ChangeYourLife

 

 

No assistive device? Then you are not disabled

By Akhila Damodaran

BENGALURU: Madhumitha Venkataraman, a HR professional struggles with accessibility, especially because her disability cannot be recognised instantly by an onlooker.

Born with an orthopaedic disability called Left Hemiparesis, she says, “For me to navigate places in any city is hard – sometimes, crossing the road, moving around can be a challenge.”

She says there is a lack of understanding that not all disabilities may be visible – there are disabilities which could be less visible or invisible, but need equal care and attention.

“The assumption is if you are not using an assistive device,you may not be disabled. I have an orthopaedic disability and have difficulty walking and cannot use my left hand well, but because it is not very visible, I need to keep stating the disability while seeking help. I was once travelling by public transport, and the driver refused to help me because he believed I was not disabled. I was left to fend for myself through difficult infrastructure and that was a very tough experience.”

In extension, the existing Persons with Disabilities Act, 1995 (India) covers only certain disabilities whereas the revised bill will include several other conditions such as cerebral palsy, locomotor disability and dwarfism.

“This, hopefully will bring in more holistic inclusion of the definition of disability,” she adds. She also currently works in the space of diversity and inclusion. She works with several NGOs and corporate firms across spaces of gender, disability, LGBTQIA and generational diversity.

The Right with Disabilities Bill says the National Commission (India) shall formulate regulations for the persons with disabilities laying down the standards of accessibility for the physical environment, transportation, information and communications, including appropriate technologies and systems, and other facilities and services provided to the public in urban and rural areas.

Madhumitha adds the number of persons who know and can use sign language in public spaces are very few and that again creates issues of accessibility for speech and hearing impaired persons.
“At the airport, you will come across wheelchair support, but sign language interpreters are hard to find. A few months ago, I was travelling with a friend who had partial speech and hearing impairment and there was no one to communicate with him at the airport. I had to do most of the communication on his behalf. Accessibility cannot be only for one type of disability, it needs to be inclusive to all.”

While the Persons With Disabilities Act, 1995 also says the appropriate governments and local authorities shall by notification formulate schemes for ensuring employment of persons with disabilities and that the appropriate governments and the local authorities shall, within the limits of their economic capacity and development, provide incentives to employers both in public and private sectors to ensure that at least five per cent. of their work force is composed of persons with disabilities, it does not seem to be properly implemented.

Madhumitha says, “There was a friend of mine who got a job from an organisation. He had educated the employer on his disability beforehand and had got the job on merit. He had resigned from his current job and a few days before joining, the offer was retracted stating the disability as the reason. Truly inclusive education is again very hard – majority of children with disability don’t have access to complete education, and that is a key differentiator to future growth and development.”

Originally published in The New Indian Express, 23rd November 2016.

Link to article: http://www.newindianexpress.com/cities/bengaluru/2016/nov/23/no-assistive-device-then-you-are-not-disabled-1541573–1.html

A Supreme Court Justice said 4 words in American Sign Language. Here’s why that’s awesome.

By Thom Dunn                                            

On Tuesday, April 19, U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts said, “Your motion is granted” in court. Sound typical? It’s not.

Because for the first time in U.S. history, these words were spoken from the Supreme Court bench in American Sign Language.

To most people, that probably doesn’t sound like a big deal. After all, it’s just one little phrase, right? And it’s not like he said something cool like “Awkward turtle” either.

He just said a thing that judges normally say in court.

But for the millions of Americans who are deaf or hard of hearing — including the 12 lawyers who were being sworn into the Supreme Court bar that day — it means a lot.

It wasn’t until 1982 that a deaf lawyer was given an opportunity to argue in front of the Supreme Court. More than three decades later, there are around 200 deaf lawyers working in America. By contrast, licensed lawyers make up about 0.4% of the total U.S. population.

“Some deaf or hard-of-hearing lawyers doubt that they can actually practice law,” Howard Rosenblum, one of the lawyers who was sworn in that day, told the Washington Post. But the real practice is based on intellect and deaf people have that in spades.”

“I think the biggest challenge has been to get people to give me the opportunity,” added Teresa Curtin, another deaf lawyer sworn in Chief Justice Roberts.

And that illuminates a real problem in our culture: The assumption that people with physical disabilities are somehow less qualified to use their minds.

There’s another issue, too, with the way we tend to dismiss those who struggle to communicate in standard American English. But whereas we’re willing to learn bits and phrases of other languages to help us move through the world — who doesn’t know how to say “hello” or “where’s the bathroom?” in at least one other language? — we’re much less accommodating of communication barriers like deafness.

It’s easy to assume that all deaf people have a supernatural ability to read lips, for example. But lipreading is a pretty ineffective form of communication. Even if you think you’re doing a good thing by speaking slowly and oh-ver-ee-nun-see-ate-ing eh-vuh-ree sill-uh-bull, most lip-readers can still only understand about 30% of what’s being said.

American Sign Language, on the other hand, is actually an incredibly efficient way to connect with people. It’s clear, it’s concise, and there are less complicated verb conjugations to worry about. You don’t have to worry about talking over someone in order to be heard. You can communicate with anyone in a crowd as long as they’re in eyesight, and that’s pretty cool!

Deaf people, like anyone else, are capable of amazing things. But if we’re going to make them find their way in the hearing world, the least we can do is talk to them on their terms.

By speaking those four simple words in ASL, Chief Justice Roberts demonstrated a willingness to embrace the Deaf community and meet them where they are. Instead of sitting back and watching as they climbed across the hearing barriers, that one simple signing action communicated something much more than words. It said, “I see you, and I acknowledge that you matter just as much as anyone else.”

 Update 4/25/2016: 12 lawyers who are deaf or hard of hearing were admitted to the Supreme Court bar on April 19. A 13th will also be admitted via written submission.
Article published on http://www.upworthy.com, April 2oth 2016 (http://www.upworthy.com/a-supreme-court-justice-said-4-words-in-american-sign-language-heres-why-thats-awesome)